[PLUG] Re: Re: separate partition for /home

Raseel Bhagat raseelbhagat at rediffmail.com
Mon Sep 4 21:33:34 PDT 2006


  
Hi, 

On Sun, 03 Sep 2006 श्रीधर नारायण दैठणकर wrote :
>On Sunday 03 September 2006 12:32, Kunal Thakar wrote:
> > Only lately did I realize that maintaining a separate partition for /home
> > could solve my woes to a large extent. The question is that will it be
> > necessary to remove all the hidden folders from /home like .gnome2, .gconf
> > and all the rc files when I want to install a new distro? If I am
> > installing a newer version of the same distro, is it ok to keep these files
> > so as to preserve my settings?
> > Are there any other disadvantages of keeping a separate /home partition?
>
>Problem is that there is no guarantee that old settings will work, can be
>migrated to newer/other version etc.
>
>This is the single most disadvantage of /home on a separae partition.
>
>I suggest you another approach. Keep all your data, in another partition and
>blow away /home every time you reinstall. /home is not the only place a
>non-root user can have access to..

Although this seems like a viable solution, using home is one of those habits that die hard:-)

Like the OP, even I have a habit of installing a LOT of OSes at the same time. 
Over the years of screwing up my /home. re-installing on a Primary partitions and in most cases, completely screwing up the partition table, I have come to the conclusion that if you want more OSes, just use more SEPARATE LOGICAL PARTITIONS.

Its the best way and one which causes least headache. Otherwise, I spend up more time on the partition table issues than actually test-driving my new OS.

So, just have a huge Extended partition and keep installing the OSes in this partition.

Please post here, if you come up with a better solution. :-)

Raseel.
The OpenSourceDeal : http://osd.byethost8.com/
http://raseel.livejournal.com


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